Administrative Services Managers

General Information

Description

Plan, direct, or coordinate one or more administrative services of an organization, such as records and information management, mail distribution, facilities planning and maintenance, custodial operations, and other office support services.

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Workplace at a Glance

What you can expect to experience while on the job

  • Responsibility
  • Exposure to job hazards
  • Physical activity
  • Decision making
  • Repetitiveness
  • Level of competition
  • Time pressure

Industry areas

  • Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OES Designation)
  • Management of Companies and Enterprises
  • Colleges, Universities, and Professional Schools

Job Outlook

Employment of administrative services managers is projected to grow 10 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. Administrative tasks, including facility management and records and information management, will remain important in a wide range of industries. A continuing focus on the environmental impact and energy efficiency of buildings will keep facility managers in demand. Improving energy efficiency can reduce costs and often is required by regulation. For example, building codes typically ensure that buildings meet environmental standards. Facility managers will be needed to oversee these improvements in a wide range of areas, from heating and air-conditioning systems to roofing. In addition, facility managers will be needed to plan for natural disasters, ensuring that any damage to a building will be minimal and that the organization can get back to work quickly. “Smart building” technology is expected to affect the work of facility managers over the next decade. This technology will provide facility managers with timely and detailed information, such as equipment failure alerts and reminders to perform maintenance. This information should allow facility managers to complete their work more efficiently. Records and information managers also are expected to see employment growth. Demand is expected to be particularly strong for those working in “information governance,” which includes the privacy and legal aspects of records management. As cloud computing and mobile devices become more prevalent, records and information managers will have a critical role in helping organizations develop new records and information management practices and in maintaining data security.

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Salary

State-by-state Salary

Gray states indicate no data available

$121,050
$50,120
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Education

Most Common Education Levels

People in this career achieve this level of education.

  • High school 33%
  • Bachelor's degree 24%
  • Some college 13%
  • Post-secondary certificate 13%
  • Associate's degree 11%
  • Master's degree 3%
  • Doctoral degree 0%
  • Post baccalaureate 0%
  • Less than high school 0%
  • Post-doctoral training 0%
  • Post-master's certificate 0%
  • First professional degree 0%

Knowledge

  • Clerical
  • Customer and Personal Service
  • Administration and Management
  • Computers and Electronics
  • Personnel and Human Resources

Skills at a Glance

Skills helpful in this career

  • Verbal skills
  • Critical thinking & problem solving
  • Equipment operation & maintenance
  • Math & science skills
  • Technology design & control
  • Leadership
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