Chemical Engineers

General Information

Description

Design chemical plant equipment and devise processes for manufacturing chemicals and products, such as gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics, detergents, cement, paper, and pulp, by applying principles and technology of chemistry, physics, and engineering.

Workplace at a Glance

What you can expect to experience while on the job

  • Responsibility
  • Exposure to job hazards
  • Physical activity
  • Decision making
  • Repetitiveness
  • Level of competition
  • Time pressure

Industry areas

  • Chemical Manufacturing (3251, 3252, 3253, and 3259 only)
  • Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services
  • Scientific Research and Development Services

Job Outlook

Employment of chemical engineers is projected to grow 6 percent from 2018 to 2028, about as fast as the average for all occupations. Demand for chemical engineers’ services depends largely on demand for the products of various manufacturing industries. The ability of these engineers to stay on the forefront of new emerging technologies will sustain employment growth. Many chemical engineers work in industries whose products are sought by many manufacturing firms. For instance, they work for firms that manufacture plastic resins, which are used to increase fuel efficiency in automobiles. Increased availability of domestically produced natural gas should increase manufacturing potential in the industries employing these engineers. In addition, chemical engineering will continue to migrate into dynamic fields, such as nanotechnology, alternative energies, and biotechnology, and thereby help to sustain demand for engineering services in many manufacturing industries. However, overall growth of employment will be tempered by declines in employment in some manufacturing sectors.

Read More
No Information for this section

Salary

Average Salary

Salary

$104,910

State-by-state Salary

Gray states indicate no data available

$133,710
$49,620
No Information for this section

Education

Most Common Education Levels

People in this career achieve this level of education.

  • Bachelor's degree 81%
  • Master's degree 9%
  • Doctoral degree 9%
  • High school 0%
  • Some college 0%
  • Associate's degree 0%
  • Post baccalaureate 0%
  • Less than high school 0%
  • Post-doctoral training 0%
  • Post-master's certificate 0%
  • First professional degree 0%
  • Post-secondary certificate 0%

Knowledge

  • Engineering and Technology
  • Chemistry
  • Design
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

Skills at a Glance

Skills helpful in this career

  • Verbal skills
  • Critical thinking & problem solving
  • Equipment operation & maintenance
  • Math & science skills
  • Technology design & control
  • Leadership
No Information for this section