Environmental Engineers

General Information

Description

Research, design, plan, or perform engineering duties in the prevention, control, and remediation of environmental hazards using various engineering disciplines. Work may include waste treatment, site remediation, or pollution control technology.

Workplace at a Glance

What you can expect to experience while on the job

  • Responsibility
  • Exposure to job hazards
  • Physical activity
  • Decision making
  • Repetitiveness
  • Level of competition
  • Time pressure

Industry areas

  • Architectural, Engineering, and Related Services
  • Management, Scientific, and Technical Consulting Services
  • State Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OES Designation)

Job Outlook

Employment of environmental engineers is projected to grow 8 percent from 2016 to 2026, about as fast as the average for all occupations. State and local governments’ concerns about water are leading to efforts to increase the efficiency of water use. Such a focus differs from that of wastewater treatment, for which this occupation is traditionally known. Most of the projected employment growth for environmental engineers is in professional, scientific, and technical services, as governments at the state and local levels draw on the industry to help address water efficiency concerns. The federal government’s requirements to clean up contaminated sites are expected to help sustain demand for these engineers’ services. In addition, wastewater treatment is becoming a larger concern in areas of the country where drilling for shale gas requires the use and disposal of massive volumes of water. Environmental engineers should continue to be needed to help utility companies and water treatment plants comply with federal or state environmental regulations, such as regulations regarding emissions from coal-fired power plants.

Read More
No Information for this section

Salary

Average Salary

Salary

$86,730

State-by-state Salary

Gray states indicate no data available

$108,350
$56,660
No Information for this section

Education

Most Common Education Levels

People in this career achieve this level of education.

  • Master's degree 48%
  • Bachelor's degree 40%
  • Post baccalaureate 7%
  • Post-master's certificate 3%
  • High school 0%
  • Some college 0%
  • Doctoral degree 0%
  • Associate's degree 0%
  • Less than high school 0%
  • Post-doctoral training 0%
  • First professional degree 0%
  • Post-secondary certificate 0%

Related College Majors

Select major to see colleges that offer it

Knowledge

  • Engineering and Technology
  • Mathematics
  • Design
  • Chemistry
  • Physics

Skills at a Glance

Skills helpful in this career

  • Verbal skills
  • Critical thinking & problem solving
  • Equipment operation & maintenance
  • Math & science skills
  • Technology design & control
  • Leadership
No Information for this section